Ada Lovelace

She was known by many names, but whatever you call her, she was one talented lady! In this BrainPOP movie, Tim and Moby introduce you to Ada Lovelace, whom many historians credit as being the first computer programmer. You’ll learn all about her early years, including her famous father, her battle against a major illness, and her early studies in mathematics. You’ll also discover how Lovelace’s teachers introduced her to a world rarely opened to girls and women in the 19th century. And you’ll meet mathematician and inventor Charles Babbage, whose calculating machines inspired Lovelace and led to her most famous contribution to computer science. It’s a lovely story, so click on the link and learn!

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3 comments
  1. Michael Drezek said:

    I think it is important for students to learn about the contributions women have made to STEM fields. It could inspire the next Ada Lovelace. I would have students watch the BrainPOP movie, play the Time Zone X game to expand their knowledge and make it interactive. Then I would have students create their own VR application using Blockly or JavaScript programming in CoSpaces Edu. Students could also work in Code.org App Lab to create their own app or remix an existing one. This could also lead to a writing activity for students to get curious and creative, predicting or inventing their own technology they would like to see exist 50 years from now. A “What if…?” prompt would work well.

  2. Allison Mittelkamp said:

    I love how the lesson plans don’t just stop at exploring computer programming. They’ve got history lessons and ela lessons involved here as well. I would love to see connections to other STEM content areas as well. Connect it to solving math problems, or the science behind the computer (for older students) perhaps.

  3. Leslie Taylor said:

    This year I used Ada Lovelace to introduce the biography genre. She is also an inspiration to anyone who has overcome a disability or illness. After reading the book, I had the students create a list of questions they would ask her if she were alive today. The students then researched to see if they could find an answer to their question. Using the new Make-a-Movie activity will definitely be added to next year’s plans.