Grade Levels: 3-5, 6-8

*Click to open and customize your own copy of the Commas Lesson Plan

This lesson accompanies the BrainPOP topic Commas, and supports the standard of using punctuation to indicate a pause or a break. Students demonstrate understanding through a variety of projects.


Step 1: ACTIVATE PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Display this image from the movie (timestamp: 0:17):

Ask students:

  • If you saw the sentence “let’s eat students”, what would you think it means? ?
  • How could a comma correct the meaning of the sentence?  

Step 2: BUILD BACKGROUND

  • Read the description on the Commas topic page.
  • Play the Movie, pausing to check for understanding. 
  • Have students read one of the two Related Reading articles. Partner them with someone who read a different article to share what they learned with each other.

Step 3: ENGAGE
Students express what they learned about commas while practicing essential literacy skills with one or more of the following activities. Differentiate by assigning ones that meet individual student needs.

  • Make-a-Movie: Create a commercial for punctuation that advertises the importance of commas by answering the question: How do commas help to make writing clear and easy to read in different situations? (Essential Literacy Skill: Determine central ideas)
  • Make-a-Map: Use examples to explain the role of commas in different situations, like sentences with nonrestrictive clauses, independent clauses, or lists. (Essential  Literacy Skill: Summarize key details)
  • Creative Coding: Code a game where players determine whether or not a sentence needing a comma is punctuated correctly. (Essential Literacy Skill: Evaluate content presented in diverse formats)

Step 4: APPLY & ASSESS 

Apply: Students take the Comma Challenge, applying essential literacy skills while demonstrating what they learned about this topic.

Assess: Wrap up the lesson with the Comma Quiz

Step 5:  EXTEND LEARNING

Related BrainPOP Topics: Deepen understanding of punctuation with these topics: Clauses, Sentence Fragments, and Run-On Sentences.

Additional Support Resources:

Comments