Grade Levels: K-3

These classroom activities are designed to complement the Listening and Speaking topic on BrainPOP Jr.

Reading Tag
Discuss tips to read out loud together, such as reading clearly and using emotion. Then choose a book together and read it out loud with your students. Read the first few sentences or paragraph and model good reading skills. Then “tag” a student in the class to read the next section. Encourage students to read with feeling and even be exuberant or silly if necessary. After practicing as a class, your students may want to rehearse reading their favorite stories to each other, and then read them to buddies in other classes or younger grades.

Speeches

If possible, show a video of moving speeches to your class, such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Ask students to take notes about the speaker and how he or she delivered the speech. What body language was used? What emotions were communicated? Discuss with the whole class. To take the activity further, students can write their own speeches about a topic they feel strongly about and present it to the class.

Debate

Pick a topic together where students will agree or disagree. For example, what kind of pet should the class get? Where should the class go on their next field trip? Have students state their opinions and back them up with reasons. Then have students who disagree explain their opinions.

Simon Says and Says

It can be difficult for students to remember and follow the multi-step directions in the classroom. Help your students develop listening skills and memory with this game. Start by giving one direction at a time, such as “Simon says touch your knees with your thumbs”. After a few rounds, add in a second direction, such as “Simon says pat your head three times and then jump twice”. You can challenge your students by giving three or four directions in a row.

 

Extension Activities:

Speeches
If possible, show a video of moving speeches to your class, such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Ask students to take notes about the speaker and how he or she delivered the speech. What body language was used? What emotions were communicated? Discuss with the whole class. To take the activity further, students can write their own speeches about a topic they feel strongly about and present it to the class.

Debate
Pick a topic together where students will agree or disagree. For example, what kind of pet should the class get? Where should the class go on their next field trip? Have students state their opinions and back them up with reasons. Then have students who disagree explain their opinions.

Simon Says and Says
It can be difficult for students to remember and follow the multi-step directions in the classroom. Help your students develop listening skills and memory with this game. Start by giving one direction at a time, such as “Simon says touch your knees with your thumbs”. After a few rounds, add in a second direction, such as “Simon says pat your head three times and then jump twice”. You can challenge your students by giving three or four directions in a row.

Family and Homeschool Activities for Teaching Listening and Speaking Skills

Drama
Watch a dramatic play or movie together. If possible, have your child take notes about the actors’ performances. How do they speak? How do they show emotions? Explain that plays and movies are exciting to watch because the actors speak with feeling. If you are watching a movie together, you may want to turn off the sound and discuss how the experience changes.

Body Language
Challenge your child to communicate without speaking! Spend an hour conversing without using words. You may want to do an activity together, such as eating lunch or walking in the park. How can you convey information? As an extension, you can go to the library to learn about sign language and research how deaf and hearing impaired people use their bodies and facial expressions to communicate.

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